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Gender Pay Gap Report

April 2018

(Weavers Close Limited employs all staff working at Gulliver’s Theme Parks and Resorts in Matlock Bath, Warrington and Milton Keynes)

1. What is a Gender Pay Gap Report and why must we publish it?

The gender pay gap is a measure of the difference in pay received by men and women. The gender pay gap is expressed as a figure representing women's pay as a percentage of that received by men.
The gender pay gap is different to, and not simply a measure of, an employer's compliance with equal pay for equal work legislation. This is because, while breach of equal pay legislation may be one contributing factor to a gender pay gap in some organisations, the gender pay gap is affected by a number of factors, most significantly women statistically being more likely to work part-time, in lower-paid sectors and less often being appointed to senior roles.
The gender pay gap has always been a topic of interest, but in an attempt to increase awareness and improve pay equality, the UK government introduced compulsory reporting of the gender pay gap.
From 2017, any organisation that has 250 or more employees must publish and report specific figures about their gender pay gap. Employers must both publish their gender pay gap data and a written statement on their public-facing website and report their data to government online - using the gender pay gap reporting service.

3. The Data

The regulations adopt a standardised method of measuring the gender pay gap so the published figures can be compared across employers and sectors. The figures must be calculated using a specific reference date called the ‘snapshot date’. The snapshot date each year is 5th April for businesses and charities and the figures must be published within a year of each snapshot date.
The required information for 2017 in respect of Weavers Close Limited, the employer of all staff working across Gulliver’s Theme Parks and Resorts, is as follows;

  • the difference between the mean hourly rate of pay between male full-pay relevant employees and female full-pay relevant employees in the pay period within which 5th April 2017 falls;1.49%
  • the difference between the median hourly rate of pay between male full-pay relevant employees and female full-pay relevant employees in the pay period within which 5th April 2017 falls;0%
  • the difference between the mean bonus pay paid to male relevant employees and that paid to female relevant employees during the period of 12 months ending on 5th April 2017;0%
  • the difference between the median bonus pay paid to male relevant employees and that paid to female relevant employees during the period of 12 months ending on 5th April 2017;0%
  • the proportions of male and female relevant employees who were paid bonus pay during the period of 12 months ending on 5th April 2017;no bonus payments made
  • the proportions of male and female full-pay relevant employees who were in the lower, lower middle, upper middle and upper quartile pay bands based on hourly rates of pay in the pay period within which 5th April 2017 falls;
    Quartile Women Men
    Upper 37% 63%
    Upper Middle 66% 34%
    Lower Middle 52% 48%
    Lower 50% 50%

    Weavers Close Limited has a total of 460 employees working across the 3 Gulliver’s Resort sites 51.3% of those employees are women and 48.7% are men.

3. Underlying causes of any gender pay gap

The causes of the wider gender pay gap are multiple and complex. Key factors which have been identified as influencing the gap include that:

  • women are concentrated in lower paid professions than men (this is sometimes referred to as 'horizontal segregation'). For example, government publications have given the following examples:
    • two thirds of women over 50 are employed in the three professions of health, education and retail
    • many of the highest paying sectors are disproportionately made up of male employees, including information and communications technology (68%) and energy supply (74%) ( Gender Pay Gap Consultation 14-7-15, p 11)
    • women make up 92% of secretaries and 94% of childcare assistants, but only 20% of architects and 7% of engineers (Gender Pay Gap Consultation 14-7-15, p 11)
  • women generally don't get as far up the career ladder as men (this is sometimes referred to as 'vertical segregation'). This is thought to be for a wide range of reasons, including career breaks, childcare, personal choice and discrimination
  • women are sometimes not as well paid as the men in their organisation even when they achieve similar levels of seniority. This may sometimes be unintentional, for example, differences may reflect:
    • historical pay rates for different jobs/roles
    • the legacy of mergers and acquisitions
    • past deals with staff associations
    • inconsistency in discretionary bonuses
    • unconscious bias or stereotyping, e.g. assumptions about mothers not wanting or being in a position to accept promotion, and
    • men's greater willingness to ask for and negotiate pay rises

4. How our gender pay gap data compares against the wider picture

In April 2017 the overall national gender pay gap was 18.4%, as reported by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in its Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings which is based on median hourly earnings excluding overtime. The gender pay gap, again based on median hourly earnings excluding overtime, was 9.1% for full-time employees and minus 5.1% for part-time employees (i.e. women working part-time have higher median hourly earnings than men). (ONS: Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, 2017 Provisional Results).
We are pleased to report that our own figures show a mean gender pay gap of only 1.49% and a median gender pay gap of 0%. We have marginally higher percentages of female employees in the upper middle and lower middle quartiles however we have equal percentages of male and female employees in the lower quartile.
Whilst we, along with other companies across the industry would report that there is a significant lack of female employees in engineering roles within the business, this has clearly not affected our overall data and is the only area where we experience a distinct gender bias.

5. Action being taken to address the gender pay gap

Due to the multiple causes of the national gender pay gap, it has been recognised that there is also a need for multiple measures to tackle it, in particular, by:

  • encouraging girls to enter a wider range of careers, including 'STEM' subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths)
  • ensuring that women have a fair chance to get to the top in the workplace
  • promoting greater pay transparency.

Gulliver’s Theme Parks and Resorts are currently talking with colleges local to our sites regarding Leisure and Entertainment Engineering Technician Apprenticeships which we intend to offer to candidates in the near future. We are hoping that going forward we will see more female candidates applying for such roles within the business and progressing into engineering roles upon completion of apprenticeship.