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Gender Pay Gap Report

April 2019

(Weavers Close Limited employs all staff working at Gulliver’s Theme Parks and Resorts in Matlock Bath, Warrington and Milton Keynes)

1. What is a Gender Pay Gap Report and why must we publish it?

The gender pay gap is a measure of the difference in pay received by men and women. The gender pay gap is expressed as a figure representing women's pay as a percentage of that received by men.
The gender pay gap is different to, and not simply a measure of, an employer's compliance with equal pay for equal work legislation. This is because, while breach of equal pay legislation may be one contributing factor to a gender pay gap in some organisations, the gender pay gap is affected by a number of factors, most significantly women statistically being more likely to work part-time, in lower-paid sectors and less often being appointed to senior roles.
The gender pay gap has always been a topic of interest, but in an attempt to increase awareness and improve pay equality, the UK government introduced compulsory reporting of the gender pay gap.
From 2017, any organisation that has 250 or more employees must publish and report specific figures about their gender pay gap. Employers must both publish their gender pay gap data and a written statement on their public-facing website and report their data to government online - using the gender pay gap reporting service.

2. The Data

The regulations adopt a standardised method of measuring the gender pay gap so the published figures can be compared across employers and sectors. The figures must be calculated using a specific reference date called the ‘snapshot date’. The snapshot date each year is 5th April for businesses and charities and the figures must be published within a year of each snapshot date.
The required information for 2018 in respect of Weavers Close Limited, the employer of all staff working across Gulliver’s Theme Parks and Resorts, is as follows;

  • the difference between the mean hourly rate of pay between male full-pay relevant employees and female full-pay relevant employees in the pay period within which 5th April 2018 falls;1.7%
  • the difference between the median hourly rate of pay between male full-pay relevant employees and female full-pay relevant employees in the pay period within which 5th April 208 falls;0%
  • the difference between the mean bonus pay paid to male relevant employees and that paid to female relevant employees during the period of 12 months ending on 5th April 2018;-16%
  • the difference between the median bonus pay paid to male relevant employees and that paid to female relevant employees during the period of 12 months ending on 5th April 2018;-35%
  • the proportions of male and female relevant employees who were paid bonus pay during the period of 12 months ending on 5th April 2018;Male employees receiving bonus pay 1%Female employees recieving bonus pay 1%
  • the proportions of male and female full-pay relevant employees who were in the lower, lower middle, upper middle and upper quartile pay bands based on hourly rates of pay in the pay period within which 5th April 2018 falls;
    Quartile Women Men
    Upper 30% 70%
    Upper Middle 58% 42%
    Lower Middle 46% 54%
    Lower 58% 42%

    Weavers Close Limited has a total of 504 employees working across the 4 Gulliver’s Resort sites 47% of those employees are women and 53% are men.

3. How our gender pay gap data compares against the wider picture

In April 2018 the overall national gender pay gap for all employees (including part time) was 17.9%, a very slight decrease from 2017 (18.4%), as reported by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in its Anual Survey of Hours and Earnings which is based on median hourly earnings excluding overtime. The gender pay gap for full time employees only, again based on median hourly earnings excluding overtime, is 8.6% compared to 9.1% in 2017.

We are pleased to report that our figures show a mean gender pay gap of only 1.7% and a median gender pay gap of 0%. We have marginally higher percentages of female employees in the upper middle and lower quartiles and marginally lower percentages of female employees in the upper and lower middle quartiles.

Whilst we, along with other companies across the industry would report that there is a significant lack of female employees in engineering roles within the business, and a lack of male employees in housekeeping roles, this has clearly not affected our overall data and is the only area where we experience a distinct gender bias.